Price is what you pay. Value is what you get

Warren Edward Buffett
" Price is what you pay. Value is what you get. "

Born in 1930, the legendary Warren Edward Buffett’s birthplace was Omaha, Nebraska. He is the second child to his parents- father Howard Buffett and mother Leila. Warren Buffett’s father was a U.S. Congressman, who was Scandinavian by origin and his mother was Spanish.

" We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful. "

Buffet’s elementary education started at Rose Hill Elementary School in Omaha. He then went to the Alice Deal Junior High School and soon completed his Master of Science in Economics. From the childhood days of his life, Buffett was always deeply interested in trading and it is from the stock market that he started making and saving money.

" Someone's sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago. "

Buffett worked in his grandfather's grocery shop and adopted many other means of income like selling cold drinks, weekly magazines, stamps and chewing gums door to door and delivering newspapers. Things took a turn when Buffett and one of his friend invested $25 to buy a pinball machine that they installed in a barber’s shop. As they started generating income out of that machine, they soon installed some more machines in other barber shops.

" It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you'll do things differently. "

Warren Buffett was just 11years old when he purchased his first shares for himself and as well as for his sister. During his graduation and studies at age of 20 he saved $9,800, and he rushed to meet Graham who was on the board of GEICO insurance. Warren yearned to work for Graham and that too without any fees. But he was refused the job and soon he came back to Omaha. He then started pursuing classes on “Investment principles” during which he also purchased a gas station, which unfortunately didn’t turn out to be profitable for him.

" It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you'll do things differently. "

In 2008, Buffett became the richest person in the world. He then went on to become a billionaire with an estimate of his company valuing approximately US$62 billion. In 2009, he donated billions of dollars to the charity and even after that Buffett was ranked as the second richest man in the United States with a net worth of US$37 billion.

" Risk comes from not knowing what you're doing. "

Warren Buffett despite having two children and a full-fledged happy family is known to donate 99.9 percent of his wealth. Warren Buffet is a perfect example for the budding entrepreneurs conveying a clear message of vision, mission, focus and hard work.

" It's far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price. "

Top 14 books recommended by Warren Edward Buffett :

image Benjamin Graham

The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing. A Book of Practical Counsel (Revised Edition) (Collins Business Essentials)

This classic text is annotated to update Graham's timeless wisdom for today's market conditions...

The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham, taught and inspired people worldwide. Graham's philosophy of "value investing" -- which shields investors from substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies -- has made The Intelligent Investor the stock market bible ever since its original publication in 1949.

Over the years, market developments have proven the wisdom of Graham's strategies. While preserving the integrity of Graham's original text, this revised edition includes updated commentary by noted financial journalist Jason Zweig, whose perspective incorporates the realities of today's market, draws parallels between Graham's examples and today's financial headlines, and gives readers a more thorough understanding of how to apply Graham's principles.

Vital and indispensable, this HarperBusiness Essentials edition of The Intelligent Investor is the most important book you will ever read on how to reach your financial goals.

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image John Brooks

Business Adventures: Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street

Business Adventures remains the best business book I’ve ever read.” —Bill Gates, The Wall Street Journal

What do the $350 million Ford Motor Company disaster known as the Edsel, the fast and incredible rise of Xerox, and the unbelievable scandals at General Electric and Texas Gulf Sulphur have in common? Each is an example of how an iconic company was defined by a particular moment of fame or notoriety; these notable and fascinating accounts are as relevant today to understanding the intricacies of corporate life as they were when the events happened.

Stories about Wall Street are infused with drama and adventure and reveal the machinations and volatile nature of the world of finance. Longtime New Yorker contributor John Brooks’s insightful reportage is so full of personality and critical detail that whether he is looking at the astounding market crash of 1962, the collapse of a well-known brokerage firm, or the bold attempt by American bankers to save the British pound, one gets the sense that history repeats itself.

Five additional stories on equally fascinating subjects round out this wonderful collection that will both entertain and inform readers . . . Business Adventures is truly financial journalism at its liveliest and best.
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image Benjamin Graham

Security Analysis: Sixth Edition, Foreword by Warren Buffett (Security Analysis Prior Editions)

"A road map for investing that I have now been following for 57 years."
--From the Foreword by Warren E. Buffett

First published in 1934, Security Analysis is one of the most influential financial books ever written. Selling more than one million copies through five editions, it has provided generations of investors with the timeless value investing philosophy and techniques of Benjamin Graham and David L. Dodd.

As relevant today as when they first appeared nearly 75 years ago, the teachings of Benjamin Graham, “the father of value investing,” have withstood the test of time across a wide diversity of market conditions, countries, and asset classes.

This new sixth edition, based on the classic 1940 version, is enhanced with 200 additional pages of commentary from some of today’s leading Wall Street money managers. These masters of value investing explain why the principles and techniques of Graham and Dodd are still highly relevant even in today’s vastly different markets. The contributor list includes:

  • Seth A. Klarman, president of The Baupost Group, L.L.C. and author of Margin of Safety
  • James Grant, founder of Grant's Interest Rate Observer, general partner of Nippon Partners
  • Jeffrey M. Laderman, twenty-five year veteran of BusinessWeek
  • Roger Lowenstein, author of Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist and When America Aged and Outside Director, Sequoia Fund
  • Howard S. Marks, CFA, Chairman and Co-Founder, Oaktree Capital Management L.P.
  • J. Ezra Merkin, Managing Partner, Gabriel Capital Group .
  • Bruce Berkowitz, Founder, Fairholme Capital Management.
  • Glenn H. Greenberg, Co-Founder and Managing Director, Chieftain Capital Management
  • Bruce Greenwald, Robert Heilbrunn Professor of Finance and Asset Management, Columbia Business School
  • David Abrams, Managing Member, Abrams Capital

Featuring a foreword by Warren E. Buffett (in which he reveals that he has read the 1940 masterwork “at least four times”), this new edition of Security Analysis will reacquaint you with the foundations of value investing―more relevant than ever in the tumultuous 21st century markets.

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image Warren E. Buffett

The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America, Fourth Edition

The gold standard of its genre, according to Warren Buffett, the fourth edition of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America marked this volume's 20th anniversary. As the book Buffett autographs most, its popularity and longevity attest to the widespread appetite for this unique compilation of Buffett's thoughts that is at once comprehensive, non-repetitive, and digestible. New and experienced readers alike will gain an invaluable informal education by perusing this classic arrangement of Warren's best writings.

The fourth edition's amazingly fresh material includes:
  • Warren's 50th anniversary retrospective, in what Bill Gates called Warren's best letter ever, on conglomerates and Berkshire's future without Buffett;

  • Charlie Munger's 50th anniversary essay on ''The Berkshire System'';

  • Warren's definitive defense of Berkshire's no-dividend practice; and

  • Warren's best advice on investing, whether in apartments, farms, or businesses.
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image Fred Schwed

Where Are the Customers' Yachts?: or A Good Hard Look at Wall Street

"Once I picked it up I did not put it down until I finished. . . .What Schwed has done is capture fully-in deceptively cleanlanguage-the lunacy at the heart of the investment business."
-- From the Foreword by Michael Lewis, Bestselling author ofLiar's Poker

". . . one of the funniest books ever written about WallStreet."
-- Jane Bryant Quinn, The Washington Post

"How great to have a reissue of a hilarious classic that provesthe more things change the more they stay the same. Only the nameshave been changed to protect the innocent."
-- Michael Bloomberg

"It's amazing how well Schwed's book is holding up afterfifty-five years. About the only thing that's changed on WallStreet is that computers have replaced pencils and graph paper.Otherwise, the basics are the same. The investor's need to believesomebody is matched by the financial advisor's need to make a niceliving. If one of them has to be disappointed, it's bound to be theformer."
-- John Rothchild, Author, A Fool and His Money, FinancialColumnist, Time magazine

Humorous and entertaining, this book exposes the folly andhypocrisy of Wall Street. The title refers to a story about avisitor to New York who admired the yachts of the bankers andbrokers. Naively, he asked where all the customers' yachts were? Ofcourse, none of the customers could afford yachts, even though theydutifully followed the advice of their bankers and brokers. Full ofwise contrarian advice and offering a true look at the world ofinvesting, in which brokers get rich while their customers gobroke, this book continues to open the eyes of investors to thereality of Wall Street.

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image John Maynard Keynes

Essays In Persuasion

Essays In Persuasion written by legendary author John Maynard Keynes is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great classic will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, Essays In Persuasion is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless piees of classic literature, this gem by John Maynard Keynes is highly recommended. Published by Classic House Books and beautifully produced, Essays In Persuasion would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.
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image Jack Welch

Jack: What I've learned leading a great company and great people

Jack Welch was perhaps the greatest corporate leader of the 20th century. When he first became CEO of General Electric in 1981 the company was worth $12 billion. Twenty years later it is worth a total of $280 billion. But Welch was more than just the leader of the most successful business in the world. He revolutionised GE's entire corporate culture with his distinctive, highly personal management style: the individual appreciation of each of his 500 managers, the commitment to an informal but driven work style and the encouragement of candour were all part of the Welch approach. Following John Harvey Jones's Making it Happen and Troubleshooter, Jack has already become the businessman's bible for the 21st century - an inspiration for a new generation of corporate players.
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image William N. Thorndike

The Outsiders: Eight Unconventional CEOs and Their Radically Rational Blueprint for Success

“An outstanding book about CEOs who excelled at capital allocation.” — Warren Buffett

#1 on Warren Buffett’s Recommended Reading List, Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder Letter, 2012

Named one of “19 Books Billionaire Charlie Munger Thinks You Should Read” in Business Insider.

“A book that details the extraordinary success of CEOs who took a radically different approach to corporate management.” — Charlie Munger, Vice-Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Corporation

“Thorndike explores the importance of thoughtful capital allocation through the stories of eight successful CEOs. A good read for any business leader but especially those willing to chart their own course.” — Michael Dell, chairman of the board of directors and chief executive officer of Dell

What makes a successful CEO? Most people call to mind a familiar definition: “a seasoned manager with deep industry expertise.” Others might point to the qualities of today’s so-called celebrity CEOs—charisma, virtuoso communication skills, and a confident management style. But what really matters when you run an organization? What is the hallmark of exceptional CEO performance? Quite simply, it is the returns for the shareholders of that company over the long term.

In this refreshing, counterintuitive book, author Will Thorndike brings to bear the analytical wisdom of a successful career in investing, closely evaluating the performance of companies and their leaders. You will meet eight individualistic CEOs whose firms’ average returns outperformed the S&P 500 by a factor of twenty—in other words, an investment of $10,000 with each of these CEOs, on average, would have been worth over $1.5 million twenty-five years later. You may not know all their names, but you will recognize their companies: General Cinema, Ralston Purina, The Washington Post Company, Berkshire Hathaway, General Dynamics, Capital Cities Broadcasting, TCI, and Teledyne. In The Outsiders, you’ll learn the traits and methods—striking for their consistency and relentless rationality—that helped these unique leaders achieve such exceptional performance.

Humble, unassuming, and often frugal, these “outsiders” shunned Wall Street and the press, and shied away from the hottest new management trends. Instead, they shared specific traits that put them and the companies they led on winning trajectories: a laser-sharp focus on per share value as opposed to earnings or sales growth; an exceptional talent for allocating capital and human resources; and the belief that cash flow, not reported earnings, determines a company’s long-term value.

Drawing on years of research and experience, Thorndike tells eye-opening stories, extracting lessons and revealing a compelling alternative model for anyone interested in leading a company or investing in one—and reaping extraordinary returns.
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image John C. Bogle

The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns

“There are a few investment managers, of course, who are very good – though in the short run, it’s difficult to determine whether a great record is due to luck or talent. Most advisors, however, are far better at generating high fees than they are at generating high returns. In truth, their core competence is salesmanship. Rather than listen to their siren songs, investors – large and small – should instead read Jack Bogle’s The Little Book of Common Sense Investing.” – Warren Buffett, Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway, 2014 Annual Shareholder Letter.

Investing is all about common sense. Owning a diversified portfolio of stocks and holding it for the long term is a winner’s game. Trying to beat the stock market is theoretically a zero-sum game (for every winner, there must be a loser), but after the substantial costs of investing are deducted, it becomes a loser’s game. Common sense tells us—and history confirms—that the simplest and most efficient investment strategy is to buy and hold all of the nation’s publicly held businesses at very low cost. The classic index fund that owns this market portfolio is the only investment that guarantees you with your fair share of stock market returns.

To learn how to make index investing work for you, there’s no better mentor than legendary mutual fund industry veteran John C. Bogle. Over the course of his long career, Bogle—founder of the Vanguard Group and creator of the world’s first index mutual fund—has relied primarily on index investing to help Vanguard’s clients build substantial wealth. Now, with The Little Book of Common Sense Investing, he wants to help you do the same.

Filled with in-depth insights and practical advice, The Little Book of Common Sense Investing will show you how to incorporate this proven investment strategy into your portfolio. It will also change the very way you think about investing. Successful investing is not easy. (It requires discipline and patience.) But it is simple. For it’s all about common sense.

With The Little Book of Common Sense Investing as your guide, you’ll discover how to make investing a winner’s game:

  • Why business reality—dividend yields and earnings growth—is more important than market expectations
  • How to overcome the powerful impact of investment costs, taxes, and inflation
  • How the magic of compounding returns is overwhelmed by the tyranny of compounding costs
  • What expert investors and brilliant academics—from Warren Buffett and Benjamin Graham to Paul Samuelson and Burton Malkiel—have to say about index investing
  • And much more

You’ll also find warnings about investment fads and fashions, including the recent stampede into exchange traded funds and the rise of indexing gimmickry. The real formula for investment success is to own the entire market, while significantly minimizing the costs of financial intermediation. That’s what index investing is all about. And that’s what this book is all about.

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image Howard Marks

The Most Important Thing Illuminated: Uncommon Sense for the Thoughtful Investor (Columbia Business School Publishing)

Howard Marks's The Most Important Thing distilled the investing insight of his celebrated client memos into a single volume and, for the first time, made his time-tested philosophy available to general readers. In this edition, Marks's wisdom is joined by the comments, insights, and counterpoints of four renowned investors and investment educators: Christopher C. Davis (Davis Funds), Joel Greenblatt (Gotham Capital), Paul Johnson (Nicusa Capital), and Seth A. Klarman (Baupost Group).

These experts lend insight into such concepts as "second-level thinking," the price/value relationship, patient opportunism, and defensive investing. Marks also adds his own annotations, expanding on his book's original themes and issues. A new chapter addresses the importance of reasonable expectations, and a foreword by Bruce C. Greenwald, called "a guru to Wall Street's gurus" by the New York Times, speaks on value investing, productivity, and the economics of information.

***

Howard Marks, the chairman and cofounder of Oaktree Capital Management, is renowned for his insightful assessments of market opportunity and risk. After four decades spent ascending to the top of the investment management profession, he is today sought out by the world's leading value investors, and his client memos brim with insightful commentary and a time-tested, fundamental philosophy. Now for the first time, all readers can benefit from Marks's wisdom, concentrated into a single volume that speaks to both the amateur and seasoned investor.

Informed by a lifetime of experience and study, The Most Important Thing explains the keys to successful investment and the pitfalls that can destroy capital or ruin a career. Utilizing passages from his memos to illustrate his ideas, Marks teaches by example, detailing the development of an investment philosophy that fully acknowledges the complexities of investing and the perils of the financial world. Brilliantly applying insight to today's volatile markets, Marks offers a volume that is part memoir, part creed, with a number of broad takeaways.

Marks expounds on such concepts as "second-level thinking," the price/value relationship, patient opportunism, and defensive investing. Frankly and honestly assessing his own decisions--and occasional missteps--he provides valuable lessons for critical thinking, risk assessment, and investment strategy. Encouraging investors to be "contrarian," Marks wisely judges market cycles and achieves returns through aggressive yet measured action. Which element is the most essential? Successful investing requires thoughtful attention to many separate aspects, and each of Marks's subjects proves to be the most important thing.

"This is that rarity, a useful book."--Warren Buffett
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